Enchanting Recipes & Everyday Life In General

Category Archives: pasta

Homemade Pasta > Store Bought Pasta

There is nothing quite like it. It’s hard to describe–that flavor…Mmm, and that texture…Yum! It actually has flavor, and it actually has texture. 
AND you can control the flavor–that’s the biggest advantage I see to making pasta at home. You want spinach pasta? Add a little spinach. Want herby pasta? Add some herbs.
The dough is very versatile and you can make whatever kind of pasta you want to out of it (ravioli, spaghetti, tortellini, etc..)
It’s very easy, and it doesn’t take too long either! 

Basic Pasta Dough

Printable Version
Recipe by Tyler Florence


You’ll need:
2 cups all purpose flour
3 eggs
1 teaspoon of salt
2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
Cornmeal, for dusting

Get your mise en place all ready.

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Mise en place means ‘everything in its place’, meaning measure all your ingredients and have them handy before you start cooking. The first step to mise en place is always to read the entire recipe from start to finish, so you know what to expect.

Dump the flour onto a clean working surface, mix in the salt

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Make it into a pretty little mound, then create a little well in the center

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Beat the eggs (Oops, I forgot to!) and

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Add the olive oil as well…

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Start to lightly beat the eggs, gradually draw flour into the mixture while beating.

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Slowly, but surely, draw more and more flour into the mixture until a firm dough starts to form.

Then, start kneading the dough.

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If the dough is too dry and hard to knead, add a little hot water.
Knead until elastic-ey, form into a ball. Dust the tabletop with cornmeal as needed to prevent sticking.

If you’re using an electric mixer...It’s even easier!

Put the flower (oops) flour in a mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment…

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Add the eggs and mix on low.

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Slowly drizzle in the olive oil…

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Mix until it comes together as a dough, then dump out onto a floured/cornmealed surface.
Knead until the dough is smooth and elastic-ey.

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This is what a picture looks like with horrible lighting.

Roll the dough into a ball.

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Orrr…

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A butt! Bahahaha.

Then cover it with plastic and let it rest for 20 minutes.

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Ta da! Pasta dough.

To use the dough, simple roll it out into a thin sheet & cut it into whichever shape you’d like.

To cook homemade pasta–it takes MUCH less time. Cook in boiling, heavily-salted water for 3-4 minutes until al dente. Serve with your favorite pasta sauce, pesto, or simply butter & parmesan cheese.

Bon Appetit!

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I’ve never made scallops before. Apparently it’s just not something they teach you in school…So I Googled it. You find anything on Google. I learned how to crochet from Google. I learned how to use Oxyclean from Google. I learned how to get my dog to stop barking from Google. I learned how to cook scallops from Google.

Now, via Google, you will learn too.

Tonight for dinner we had Scallops and Pasta.

Paul LOVES scallops. He’s not able to eat them very often, but I’m sure if asked, he’d say they are one of his favorite foods. Me, eh, I’m not the biggest fan–but anything for my boo. I do like pasta, though. Yummm pasta…So this dinner worked well for the both of us–and it was really quite simple.

The first thing you need to do is put a pot on to boil the pasta. Don’t forget to salt the water. I cannot stress this enough, folks! You need to salt you pasta water! And I’m not just talking a pinch, I’m saying add a good tablespoon. A good fistful. A good amount of salt!

Adding salt raises the boiling temperature of the water. It doesn’t make the water boil faster, like most people believe, but it does make the pasta cook faster because it allows the water to get hotter than 212˚ (boiling point). I learned this from Google as well. The reason I stress salting the water though is not to make the pasta cook faster, it’s to season your pasta. This is the only way to actually season pasta because the salt won’t really stick once the pasta is cooked…so why not just cook it in salt? Salt, yummmmm.

So. First: boil your water.

While your water is boiling, chop up 1 tomato, a couple sprigs of parsley, 2 garlic cloves, and slice a lemon in half.

Also, measure out 1 cup of white wine (or chicken stock, or beer) and 1 tablespoon of butter.

Set all that stuff aside–once your pasta is done cooking, drain it and set it aside as well.

Now, for the scallops:

The most important thing about pan-searing scallops is to make sure they’re dry. So when you get them out of their package, put then on a plate with paper towel. Then flip them over, to dry the other side. Then, move them to a brand new dry paper towel. Then pat the top again. As they sit, their juices come to the surface, so make sure you pat them right before you put them in the pan. Oh, and sprinkle them with salt and pepper.

Please excuse my nails. I had to remove my nail polish in a rush this morning before school. Grossss.

For the most perfect, golden brown, crunchy sear that you really want on these bad boys–make sure your pan is piping hot. Hot hot. Not burning hot, but hot. To test if its hot enough, get your finger wet and splash just a drop of water on it. If it sizzles, it’s hot enough.
Drizzle a dab of oil in a hot hot large skillet, about a half dollar size. I used olive oil because it was handy, but you can use vegetable oil if you desire. I don’t recommend butter because it burns faster than oil. You don’t want to burn these suckers. Swirl the oil in the pan so it coats it. 

Lay the dry scallops in the pan with plenty of space in between them. You want them to have enough room to get a good sear. Here’s a secret when you put them in: DON’T MOVE THEM! 
Leave them be. Let the scallops rest. Let them get nice and toasty brown. Let them get a delicious crust. Let them sit in peace for 2 whole minutes.  
After 2 minutes, flip them over. Let them cook again for another minute and a half–again, DON’T move them! Drizzle a little more oil in the pan and swirl it around after you flip them. 

After a minute and a half, remove the scallops from the pan and transfer to a new paper towel.
(Note, these cooking times are for large sea scallops, cooking times are different for smaller sea scallops.)

Next, reduce the heat in the pan to low and add a tablespoon of butter (unless you have a lot of oil remaining in the pan from the scallops.) Add the chopped garlic. 10 seconds later, add the diced tomato. After about a minute, turn the heat back to high and add the wine (or chicken stock, or beer).

When you add the wine, the pan should steam a whole lot and all the brown bits from the bottom of the pan will be released. Use your spoon to scrape up these brown bits as you stir around the wine. Add the chopped parsley.

About a minute later, add the cooked pasta to the pot and mix it well. Sprinkle with fresh squeeze lemon juice (half a lemon).

Serve in a bowl with the scallops. Garnish with parsley sprigs.

Yumyumyum. My first scallops experience was a success and it only took about 20 minutes. Paul LOVED it too, an added bonus!

The easy to follow recipe:

Scallops & Pasta from Steamykitchen

  • 4 ounces, weight Dried Pasta Of Your Choice
  • 10 Sea Scallops (or Jumbo Shrimp)
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Butter
  • 2 clovea Garlic, Finely Diced
  • 1 whole Tomato, Chopped
  • 1 cup White Wine, Beer, Or Vegetable Stock
  • 3 sprig Parsley, Finely Minced
  • Just A Bit Of Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
  • Salt And Pepper
1. Cook the pasta in salted water per the instructions on the box. Drain and set aside.
2. In the meantime, prep all the ingredients and have them at the ready nearby. For the scallops (or shrimp), use a couple of layers of paper towels and pat very dry. Move the scallops to a clean sheet of paper towel and pat dry once more. Season with salt and pepper on both sides.
3. Heat a large frying pan or saute pan over high heat. When hot, swirl in the olive oil. Add the scallops to the pan, not touching. Give each scallop ample room so that they can sear properly. Cook for 2 minutes without touching (1 1/2 minutes if using smaller pieces of scallops or shrimp) then flip and cook for another 1-2 minutes until cooked through. Remove to a plate.
4. Turn the heat to low. Add the butter and the garlic. Saute for just 10 seconds and then add the tomatoes.
5. Turn the heat to high and add in the white wine (or beer or vegetable stock). Let it bubble a bit for 30 seconds and use your spatula to scrape up the bits in the pan. Season with salt and pepper, throw in the parsley and then add in your cooked pasta. Stir well to let the sauce coat the pasta. Serve with the scallops.


Gotta go! I’m chatting with my Boo on Facebook chat….Well, umm…We’re on the same couch too…

Enjoy 🙂